Coronavirus: A visual guide to the pandemic

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Coronavirus has been spreading rapidly across the world, affecting more than 160 countries and claiming more than 11,000 lives.

There are now more than 260,000 confirmed cases — most outside China where the virus originated. Europe is at the centre of the crisis, with cases and deaths rising in several countries.

This series of maps and charts will help you understand what is going on.

1. The virus outbreak is a global pandemic

The rise in the number of daily confirmed cases internationally has led the World Health Organization (WHO) to declare the spread of coronavirus a global pandemic.

This is when an infectious disease is passing easily from person to person in many parts of the world at the same time.

Coronavirus global cases, 21 March 2020

This information is regularly updated but may not reflect the latest totals for each country.

Cases Deaths
China 81,421 3,261
Italy 47,021 4,032
Spain 21,571 1,093
Germany 19,848 68
Iran 19,644 1,433
USA 19,593 260
France 12,614 450
South Korea 8,799 102
Switzerland 5,544 56
UK 3,983 177
Netherlands 2,995 106
Austria 2,649 6
Belgium 2,257 37
Norway 1,959 7
Sweden 1,639 16
Denmark 1,255 9
Canada 1,085 12
Malaysia 1,030 3
Portugal 1,020 6
Japan 1,016 35
Brazil 977 11
Czech Republic 833
Australia 791 7
Diamond Princess cruise ship 712 8
Israel 705 1
Ireland 683 3
Turkey 670 9
Pakistan 501 3
Greece 495 10
Luxembourg 484 5
Qatar 470
Finland 450
Chile 434
Ecuador 426 7
Poland 425 5
Iceland 409
Singapore 385 2
Indonesia 369 32
Saudi Arabia 344
Slovenia 341 1
Thailand 322 1
Romania 308
Bahrain 298 1
Egypt 285 8
Estonia 283
Peru 263 4
Russia 253 1
India 250 5
Philippines 230 18
Iraq 208 17
South Africa 202
Panama 200 1
Lebanon 177 4
Mexico 164 1
Kuwait 159
Argentina 158 3
San Marino 144 14
United Arab Emirates 140 2
Slovakia 137 1
Armenia 136
Taiwan 135 2
Serbia 135 1
Croatia 130 1
Colombia 128
Bulgaria 127 3
Costa Rica 113 2
Latvia 111
Uruguay 94
Vietnam 91
Algeria 90 11
Bosnia and Herzegovina 89
Morocco 86 3
Jordan 85
Hungary 85 4
Faroe Islands 80
Brunei 78
North Macedonia 76
Cyprus 75
Andorra 75
Sri Lanka 73
Dominican Republic 72 2
Albania 70 2
Belarus 69
Moldova 66 1
Venezuela 65
Malta 64
Lithuania 63
Tunisia 54 1
New Zealand 52
Cambodia 51
Kazakhstan 49 3
Oman 48
West Bank 48
Senegal 47
Guadeloupe 45
Azerbaijan 44 1
Georgia 43
Ukraine 41 3
Burkina Faso 40 1
Uzbekistan 33
Martinique 32 1
Liechtenstein 28
Réunion 28
Honduras 24
Afghanistan 24
Cuba 21 1
Cameroon 20
Bangladesh 20 1
DR Congo 18
Paraguay 18
Bolivia 17
Rwanda 17
Jamaica 16 1
Ghana 16
French Guiana 15
Montenegro 14
Guam 14
Puerto Rico 14
Maldives 13
Jersey 12
Nigeria 12
Mauritius 12
Guatemala 12 1
French Polynesia 11
Monaco 11
Gibraltar 10
Togo 9
Trinidad and Tobago 9
Ethiopia 9
Ivory Coast 9
Guyana 7 1
Seychelles 7
Kenya 7
Mongolia 6
Tanzania 6
Kyrgyzstan 6
Mayotte 6
Barbados 6
Equatorial Guinea 6
Aruba 5
Saint Martin 4
Suriname 4
Gabon 4 1
Bahamas 4
Cayman Islands 3 1
United States Virgin Islands 3
Namibia 3
Curaçao 3 1
Congo 3
Central African Republic 3
Saint Barthelemy 3
Madagascar 3
Guinea 2
Nicaragua 2
Guernsey 2
Kosovo 2
Sudan 2 1
Saint Lucia 2
Liberia 2
Bhutan 2
Bermuda 2
Haiti 2
Mauritania 2
Greenland 2
Benin 2
Zambia 2
Djibouti 1
Somalia 1
Papua New Guinea 1
Cape Verde 1
Niger 1
Montserrat 1
Gambia 1
El Salvador 1
Eswatini 1
Vatican 1
St Vincent and the Grenadines 1
Nepal 1
Chad 1
Isle of Man 1
Antigua and Barbuda 1
Angola 1
Fiji 1
Zimbabwe 1

Source: Johns Hopkins University, national public health agencies

Last updated on 21 March 2020, 06:00 GMT.

More than 80,000 people in China have been diagnosed with the infection since its emergence in the city of Wuhan, Hubei province, in December — although its exact source has not yet been identified.

But there are now more than 180,000 confirmed cases outside China, according to the latest figures from Johns Hopkins University.

The WHO said it took more than three months to reach the first 100,000 confirmed cases worldwide, but only 12 days to reach the next 100,000.

While these figures are for confirmed cases, the actual number of people with coronavirus internationally is thought to be much higher — as many of those with mild symptoms have not been tested and counted.

In response to the virus’s spread, countries around the world are ramping up measures to try to slow it down.

Governments have halted flights from virus-hit nations, locked down towns and cities and urged people to stay at home.

President Donald Trump has declared a national emergency in the US and announced a travel ban on European countries, including the UK and Ireland, as well as China and Iran.

Travellers from outside the EU are also being turned away from airports and borders after the 27-country bloc imposed a 30-day ban on entry.

Many international conferences and sporting events have also been cancelled or postponed, including Six Nations rugby matches, Euro 2020, the Copa America and this year’s meeting of G7 leaders in the US.

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2. The virus has killed more people in Italy than China

Italy currently has the most confirmed cases outside China — and on Thursday surpassed China’s death toll.

While Italy has about 47,000 confirmed cases compared with China’s 81,000, its death toll of 4,000 exceeds China’s by several hundred.

The majority of Italy’s deaths have occurred in the northern Lombardy region, which contains the city of Milan. Hospitals there are reportedly at breaking point and retired doctors and nurses have been asked to return to work.

The recent jump in deaths comes despite Italian authorities imposing stringent restrictions, closing nearly all shops, bars, hairdressers, restaurants and cafes.

The number of new confirmed cases in Italy also continues to spiral.

They have been increasing since the beginning of March, and there have been almost 30,000 new confirmed cases in the past week.

Schools, gyms, museums, nightclubs and other venues have been shut, and people have been ordered to stay at home and seek permission for essential travel in a bid to slow the virus’s spread.

The lockdown, imposed on 12 March, has now been extended beyond the original 25 March end date.

A number of airlines, including British Airways, EasyJet and Ryanair, have cancelled Italy flights until the start of April.

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3. Numbers across Europe are also rising

Other European countries have also seen steep rises in infections and deaths, and the region has become the new epicentre of the crisis.

As well as Italy, Spain, France, Germany and the UK now have thousands of confirmed cases each.

Germany’s Chancellor Angela Merkel has warned that up to 70% of its population — some 58 million people — could contract coronavirus.

However, some German virologists dispute the high figure, suggesting a worst-case scenario of 40,000 cases.

Spain, which now has the third highest number of cases outside China, brought in a state of emergency on 14 March.

In the UK, confirmed cases stand at 3,983, and 177 people have died.

On Monday, Prime Minister Boris Johnson announced a shift in strategy, urging everyone in the UK to avoid unnecessary social contact and work from home where possible.

On Friday he said that pubs, restaurants, theatres, leisure centres and gyms should all close.